Official SHEA Guidelines quick-reference tools provide your physicians, fellows, nurses and students with instant access to current SHEA guidelines information in a clear concise format. These GUIDELINES Pocketcards are available in both print and digital versions. Members save 20% - Enter code SHEAMEM at checkout.

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  Infection Prevention in the Operating Room Anesthesia Work Area GUIDELINES Pocket Guide

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Duration of Contact Precautions GUIDELINES Pocket Card

SHEA

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Healthcare-Associated Infections GUIDELINES Pocket Card

A Compendium of Prevention Recommendations

SHEA, IDSA, AHA, APIC, The Joint Commission

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Animals in Healthcare Facilities GUIDELINES Pocket Card

A Compendium of Prevention Recommendations

SHEA, IDSA, AHA, APIC, The Joint Commission

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Isolation Precautions for Visitors GUIDELINES Pocket Card

A Compendium of Prevention Recommendations

SHEA, IDSA, AHA, APIC, The Joint Commission

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Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Surgery

SHEA, ASHP, IDSA, SIS

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Antimicrobial Stewardship

SHEA, IDSA

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This section is not intended to be a comprehensive list, but a starting point to help you gather information on epidemiology, infection prevention, infectious diseases, and quality improvement.

SHEA is not responsible for the content of these sites, and their inclusion does not imply endorsement.

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International Resources

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Translation provided by Northern Inyo Hospital Northern Inyo County Local Hospital District

Rationale for Hand Hygiene Recommendations after Caring for a Patient with Clostridium difficile Infection - Fall 2011 Update

This brief responds to Questions that frequently arise in regards to the recommended method of hand hygiene after caring for patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The brief clarifies that although soap and water is superior to removing C. difficile spores from hands of volunteers compared to alcohol-based hand hygiene products, there have been no studies in acute care settings that have demonstrated an increase in CDI with alcohol-based hand hygiene products or a decrease in CDI with soap and water. This is why preferential use of soap and water for hand hygiene after caring for a patient with CDI is not recommended in non-outbreak settings.
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